Sunday, October 03, 2010

Memorizing Numbers--Or Not

SUMMARY: A little more from the judging clinic.
Related posts:
Just a few notes on some of the numbers we were supposed to memorize for the written test. I didn't get nearly all of them (and some of my misses were just dumb--if you don't know by now that the Aframe contact is 42" and the others are 36", you're just not paying attention--and/or having a brain freeze on the test!).

But usually I remember patterns and exceptions better than I remember strictly bunches of numbers.

Here are some. Because I'm talking through the patterns, the discussions are long, but the ideas are fairly simple.

What are the height cutoffs for the various jump heights?
First, of course, you must know that the jump heights (championship) are 12", 16", 22", and 26". The height ranges at the shoulder for dogs are:
  • Up to and including 12" for 12" jump height.
  • Then through 16" for 16" jump height. (See the pattern?)
  • Then through 21" for 22" jump height (there's the exception, it's one inch lower).
  • Of course, anything over 21" jumps 26"
In performance, the ranges are exactly the same, but the jump heights are all one level lower (8", 12", 16", and 22").

What are the spread jump lengths?
I used to remember that it was twice the jump height, but that changed when they altered the jump heights way back when.

Old jump heights were 6" apart: 30", 24", 18", and 12". (There are 5 boards, 4 boards, 3 boards, and 2 boards. Easy to remember that.)

Old spread lengths were 60" (30"x2), 48" (24"x2), 36" (18"x2), and 20" (exception, not 2x12").

And--the NEW spread lengths are still exactly the same!--60", 48", 36", and 20" (for 26", 22", 18", and 12", respectively.)

For performance--take out the smallest board in all cases. So the spread distances drop by one height level--for 8" performance, it's only one board; for the others, it's 20", 36", and 48". (And 1, 2, 3, and 4 boards.)

What are the yards-per-second ranges (min and max) and absolute minimums for setting Standard course times?
Here's the patterns I figured out. I have to remember only 3 numbers, 3 patterns, and two exceptions, instead of 21 different numbers.

Starters: The range is 2.0 to 2.25 yps for all heights. (That's 2 of the numbers to remember.)

Advanced and Masters: The range sequence starts at 2.5 for advanced 12" dogs. (That's the other number.)

The normal minimums go like this:

Adv 12" 2.5
Adv 16" 2.6 (that's +.1 over 12")
Adv 22/26" 2.75 (+.15)
Mas 12" 2.75 (same as Adv 22/26 number)
Mas 16" 2.85 (+.1)
Mas 22/26 3.00 (+.15)

see the pattern--+.1 and +.15

The maximums go like this:
min max
Adv 12" 2.5 2.6 (that's +.1 over the min)
Adv 16" 2.6 2.8 (+.2 over)
Adv 22/26" 2.75 2.95 (I'd expect +.3, but noo--it's .2 over and an exception)
Mas 12" 2.75 2.85 (+.1 over the min)
Mas 16" 2.85 3.05 (+.2 over)
Mas 22/26 3.00 3.30 (+.3 over)


The absolute minimum is exactly the same as the normal minimum in all cases except they treat 16" masters dogs differently, so their absolute min is the same as the 12" dogs.

So my table looks something like this in patterns:

min
(add to
previous min)
max
(add to min)
abs min
Starters 2.0 2.25 same as min
Adv 12" 2.5 +.1 same as min
Adv 16" +.1 +.2 same as min
Adv 22/26" +.15 +.2* same as min
Mas 12" same as
adv 22/26"
+.1 same as min
Mas 16" +.1 +.2 same as 12"*
Mas 22/26 +.15 +.3 same as min

*=exceptions

OR you could memorize the numbers in this table:
min max Abs min
Starters2.02.252.0
Adv 12" 2.5 2.6 2.5
Adv 16" 2.6 2.8 2.6
Adv 22/26" 2.75 2.95 2.75
Mas 12" 2.75 2.85 2.75
Mas 16" 2.85 3.05 2.75
Mas 22/26 3.00 3.30 3.00


OK, then, I have answered three questions, and that is enough,
I fear that I'll give myself airs!
Do I think you can listen all day to such stuff?
Let's be off, or you'll kick me down stairs!

1 comment:

  1. My masters swim coach gives us complicated workouts with time intervals and swim distances that change throughout the workout and I remember them as patterns as well. If I tried to memorize each number I'd be dead in the water, so to speak. Funny how the brain works.

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